Aztec Rain Dance

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Aztec Rain Dance

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Native American - Music- (Rain dance)

Aztec , self name Culhua-Mexica , Nahuatl-speaking people who in the 15th and early 16th centuries ruled a large empire in what is now central and southern Mexico.

See also pre-Columbian civilizations: Aztec culture to the time of the Spanish conquest. It is possible that their migration southward was part of a general movement of peoples that followed, or perhaps helped trigger, the collapse of the Toltec civilization.

The basis of Aztec success in creating a great state and ultimately an empire was their remarkable system of agriculture , which featured intensive cultivation of all available land, as well as elaborate systems of irrigation and reclamation of swampland.

The high productivity gained by those methods made for a rich and populous state. The Aztec state was a despotism in which the military arm played a dominant role.

Valour in war was, in fact, the surest path to advancement in Aztec society, which was caste- and class-divided but nonetheless vertically fluid.

The priestly and bureaucratic classes were involved in the administration of the empire, while at the bottom of society were classes of serfs, indentured servants, and outright slaves.

Aztec religion was syncretistic, absorbing elements from many other Mesoamerican cultures. At base, it shared many of the cosmological beliefs of earlier peoples, notably the Maya , such as that the present earth was the last in a series of creations and that it occupied a position between systems of 13 heavens and 9 underworlds.

Closely entwined with Aztec religion was the calendar, on which the elaborate round of rituals and ceremonies that occupied the priests was based.

The Aztec calendar was the one common to much of Mesoamerica, and it comprised a solar year of days and a sacred year of days; the two yearly cycles running in parallel produced a larger cycle of 52 years.

The Tonalpohualli was considered to be the scared calendar. There were thirteen numbers and 20 signs, each sign was assigned each of the thirteen numbers.

So was the total number of days in a year 13x Both calendars would align every 52 years, the Aztecs believed that this could bring disaster on the world so they held a very special festival the new fire festival.

This was said to be one of the most important festivals for the Aztecs. Every fire would be put out and everbody would climb up on top of their houses to watch.

The priests would dress up and climb the sacred mountain Uixachtlan. These are just a few of the many other festivals the Aztecs celebrated like the, festival of Xilonen, Festival of Xipe Totec, Celebration of Quecholli Festival and many more.

A sacrifice would be made at midnight and the priest would pull out the victim heart then lit a fire in their chest. The priest would then send around lit torches to light up every temple, school and house.

The winter veintena of Atemoztli 9 December — 28 December was also dedicated to the Tlaloque. This period preceded an important rainy season, so statues were made out of amaranth dough.

Their teeth were pumpkin seeds and their eyes, beans. Once these statues were offered copal, fine scents, and other food items, while they were also prayed to and adorned with finery.

Afterwards, their doughy chests were opened, their "hearts" taken out, before their bodies were cut up and eaten.

On the final day of the "veintena," people celebrated and held banquets. Tlaloc was also worshipped during the Huey Tozotli festival, which was celebrated annually.

While Tlaloc is not normally associated with Huey Tozotli, evidence from the Codex Borbonicus indicates that Tlaloc was worshipped during this festival.

Tlaloc was linked to the regenerative capacity of weather, and, as such, he was worshipped at Mount Tlaloc because much of the rain in Central Mexico is formed over range of which Mount Tlaloc is a part.

Archaeological evidence indicates Tlaloc was worshiped in Mesoamerica before the Aztecs even settled there in the 13th century AD.

He was a prominent god in Teotihuacan at least years before the Aztecs. Chalchiuhtlicue, or "she of the jade skirt" in Nahutatl, was the deity connected with the worship of ground water.

Therefore, her shrines were by springs, streams, irrigation ditches, or aqueducts, the most important of these shrines being at Pantitlan, in the center of Lake Texcoco.

Sometimes described as Tlaloc's sister, Chalchiuhtlicue was impersonated by ritual performers wearing the green skirt that was associated with Chalchiuhtlicue.

Like that of Tlaloc, her cult was linked to the earth, fertility and nature's regeneration. Tlaloc was first married to the goddess of flowers, Xochiquetzal , which literally translates to "Flower Quetzal.

In doing so, she is associated with pregnancies and childbirths and was believed to act as a guardian figure for new mothers.

Unlike many other female deities, Xochiquetzal maintains her youthful appearance and is often depicted in opulent attire and gold adornments.

Tlaloc was the father of Tecciztecatl , possibly with Chalchiuhtlicue. Tlaloc had an older sister named Huixtocihuatl. There is a sanctuary found atop Mount Tlaloc, dedicated to the god, Tlaloc; it is thought that the location of this sanctuary in relation to other temples surrounding it may have been a way for the Aztecs to mark the time of year and keep track of important ceremonial dates.

Archaeological, ethnohistoric, and ethnographic data indicate that these phenomena coincide with the sowing of maize in dry lands associated with agricultural sites.

It also features a structure that housed a statue of Tlaloc in addition to idols of many different religious regions, such as the other sacred mountains.

It rises over two diffierent ecological zones: alpine meadows and subalpine forests. The rainy season starts in May and lasts until October.

The highest annual temperature occurs in April, the onset of the rainy season, and the lowest in December—January.

Some years ago weather conditions were slightly more severe, but the best time to climb the mountain was practically the same as today: October through December, and February until the beginning of May.

The date of the feast of Huey Tozotli celebrated atop Mount Tlaloc coincided with a period of the highest annual temperature, shortly before dangerous thunderstorms might block access to the summit.

The first detailed account of Mount Tlaloc by Jim Rickards in was followed by visits or descriptions by other scholars. In Wicke and Horcasitas carried out preliminary archaeological investigations at the site; their conclusions were repeated by Parsons in Archaeo-astronomical research began in , some of which remains unpublished.

In excavation was undertaken at the site by Solis and Townsend. Contemporary artist Jesse Hernandez has interpreted Tlaloc in his "Urban Aztec" style at several points throughout his career, including hand-painted upon a 16" Qee in , as a painting titled Rain God in , and as a factory-produced Dunny with Kidrobot in It was a plan developed by Nozama Pharmacy's Reika Mizusawa to use a manufactured chemical pesticide deployed by flying robot drones mixed with rain water to destroy all the Amazons in a genocidal assault, similar to Tlaloc's ability to send down rain.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Redirected from Tlaloc. For the fish genus, see Tlaloc fish. Richard Introduction to Classical Nahuatl revised ed.

Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. To him was attributed the rain; for he made it, he caused it to come down, he scattered the rain like seed, and also the hail.

He caused to sprout, to blossom, to leaf out, to bloom, to ripen, the trees, the plants, our food.

Garden History. Aztecs: Reign of Blood and Splendor. Time-Life Books. Colonial Latin American Review. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

Becoming Petrified: the Making of Archaeological Personhood. Mexico City: Sternberg Press. The Art Bulletin. Water History. Thames and Hudson Inc.

The Myths of Mexico and Peru. May History of Religions. Aztecs at Mexicolor. Retrieved 20 October

Aztec dance. Tattoo ArtenAztekischer KriegerAztekische Tlaloc by Andres RiosThe Aztec deity of rain and thunder. Aztekischer Krieger, Aztekische Kunst. Dekoration, Klang- & Windspiele,Fantasy Green Petal Rain Dance Tribal Fairy With Dragon Pet Wind Chime DecorGarten & Terrasse. Aztec Beauty Jozef Szekeres by Jozef-Szekeres on DeviantArt. Aztec-Beauty.​Aruze. Aztec Dancers - Gathering of Nations Pow Wow aztec rain dancer. Dekoration, Klang- & Windspiele,Fantasy Green Petal Rain Dance Tribal Fairy With Dragon Pet Wind Chime DecorGarten & Terrasse. Ein Regentanz ist ein zeremonieller Tanz, der in der Hoffnung aufgeführt wird, Regen A. S. Barnes, New York ; ↑ Rain Dance of Zuni. (englisch); ↑ Wie​. The Atlcahualo festivals was celebrated from 12 February until 3 March. In Papantla, which is the community Monheim Bowling closely associated with Pearl Registrieren ritual. Much of it covers the period…. This differs from the Maya version of Tlaloc, as the Maya representation depicts no specific relation to jaguars. The trunk is erected with much ceremony. More About.

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Aztec Rain Dance Video

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The four voladores represent the four cardinal directions as well as the four elements: earth, air, fire and water. The caporal represents the fifth sun.

The four voladores seated on the cuadro face the caporal and at the appropriate moment fall backwards to descend to the ground suspended by the wound ropes.

As the ropes unwind, the voladores spin, creating a moving pyramid shape. This is the second Mexican event to be so recognized, with the first being the Indigenous Festivity of the Dead in The recognition carries the responsibility for Mexico to safeguard and promote the tradition to keep it alive.

A part of the nomination process was an extensive regional plan of preservation, promotion and development of the cultural heritage in Veracruz and other parts of Mexico and Central America.

It has a student population of between 70 and students who learn about the history, significance and values associated with the ritual from the pre-Hispanic period.

The school is sponsored by the Veracruz state government and children begin attending between 6 and 8 years of age.

The school requires students to meet certain requirements, such as being able to speak Totonac and girls are not permitted. However, most voladores learn the ritual from their fathers and grandfathers starting at age eight or ten.

For five days, voladores from various places perform at the poles erected at the site. The objective is not only to see the different costumes and styles of the groups but to share experiences about the fertility ritual.

One reason for the need of protection is that in most cases in Mexico, the ritual is not performed for religious purposes. The goal of the group is to offer to tourists a dignified version of the ritual at the Plaza Bandera that does not forget its roots.

Members of the group are all natives of the city of Papantla. The ceremony is held in a public park and youths are required to leave items such as bicycles and skateboards outside the ceremonial space.

To promote the ritual and the culture behind it internationally, groups of voladores have performed in many parts of Mexico and other countries as part of cultural festivals.

Media related to Voladores at Wikimedia Commons. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Mesoamerican rite. Play media.

Jeffrey K El Tajin: A Guide for Visitors. McClatchy - Tribune Business News. Washington, D. Mexico: INAH.

Archived from the original on Retrieved Papantla, Mexico: Municipality of Papantla. Retrieved 11 February Mexico: Artes e Historia magazine.

Archived from the original on 19 July La Jornada Oriental in Spanish. Puebla, mexico. Archived from the original on 26 June La Jornada in Spanish.

Aztec , self name Culhua-Mexica , Nahuatl-speaking people who in the 15th and early 16th centuries ruled a large empire in what is now central and southern Mexico.

See also pre-Columbian civilizations: Aztec culture to the time of the Spanish conquest. It is possible that their migration southward was part of a general movement of peoples that followed, or perhaps helped trigger, the collapse of the Toltec civilization.

The basis of Aztec success in creating a great state and ultimately an empire was their remarkable system of agriculture , which featured intensive cultivation of all available land, as well as elaborate systems of irrigation and reclamation of swampland.

The high productivity gained by those methods made for a rich and populous state. The Aztec state was a despotism in which the military arm played a dominant role.

Valour in war was, in fact, the surest path to advancement in Aztec society, which was caste- and class-divided but nonetheless vertically fluid.

The priestly and bureaucratic classes were involved in the administration of the empire, while at the bottom of society were classes of serfs, indentured servants, and outright slaves.

Aztec religion was syncretistic, absorbing elements from many other Mesoamerican cultures. At base, it shared many of the cosmological beliefs of earlier peoples, notably the Maya , such as that the present earth was the last in a series of creations and that it occupied a position between systems of 13 heavens and 9 underworlds.

Closely entwined with Aztec religion was the calendar, on which the elaborate round of rituals and ceremonies that occupied the priests was based.

The Aztec calendar was the one common to much of Mesoamerica, and it comprised a solar year of days and a sacred year of days; the two yearly cycles running in parallel produced a larger cycle of 52 years.

Also, the shrine contained four pitchers containing water. Each pitcher would produce a different fate if used on crops: the first would bring forth a good harvest, the second would cause the harvest to fail and rot, the third would dry the harvest out, and the final one would freeze it.

Sacrifices that took place on Mount Tlaloc were thought to favor early rains. The Atlcahualo festivals was celebrated from 12 February until 3 March.

Dedicated to the Tlaloque, this veintena involved the sacrifice of children on sacred mountaintops, like Mount Tlaloc. The children were beautifully adorned, dressed in the style of Tlaloc and the Tlaloque.

The children to be sacrificed were carried to Mount Tlaloc on litters strewn with flowers and feathers, while also being surrounded by dancers.

Once at the shrine, the children's hearts would be pulled out by priests. If, on the way to the shrine, these children cried, their tears were viewed as positive signs of imminent and abundant rains.

Every Atlcahualo festival, seven children were sacrificed in and around Lake Texcoco in the Aztec capital.

The festival of Tozoztontli 24 March — 12 April similarly involved child sacrifice. During this festival, the children were sacrificed in caves. The flayed skins of sacrificial victims that had been worn by priests for the last twenty days were taken off and placed in these dark, magical caverns.

The winter veintena of Atemoztli 9 December — 28 December was also dedicated to the Tlaloque. This period preceded an important rainy season, so statues were made out of amaranth dough.

Their teeth were pumpkin seeds and their eyes, beans. Once these statues were offered copal, fine scents, and other food items, while they were also prayed to and adorned with finery.

Afterwards, their doughy chests were opened, their "hearts" taken out, before their bodies were cut up and eaten.

On the final day of the "veintena," people celebrated and held banquets. Tlaloc was also worshipped during the Huey Tozotli festival, which was celebrated annually.

While Tlaloc is not normally associated with Huey Tozotli, evidence from the Codex Borbonicus indicates that Tlaloc was worshipped during this festival.

Tlaloc was linked to the regenerative capacity of weather, and, as such, he was worshipped at Mount Tlaloc because much of the rain in Central Mexico is formed over range of which Mount Tlaloc is a part.

Archaeological evidence indicates Tlaloc was worshiped in Mesoamerica before the Aztecs even settled there in the 13th century AD.

He was a prominent god in Teotihuacan at least years before the Aztecs. Chalchiuhtlicue, or "she of the jade skirt" in Nahutatl, was the deity connected with the worship of ground water.

Therefore, her shrines were by springs, streams, irrigation ditches, or aqueducts, the most important of these shrines being at Pantitlan, in the center of Lake Texcoco.

Sometimes described as Tlaloc's sister, Chalchiuhtlicue was impersonated by ritual performers wearing the green skirt that was associated with Chalchiuhtlicue.

Like that of Tlaloc, her cult was linked to the earth, fertility and nature's regeneration. Tlaloc was first married to the goddess of flowers, Xochiquetzal , which literally translates to "Flower Quetzal.

In doing so, she is associated with pregnancies and childbirths and was believed to act as a guardian figure for new mothers. Unlike many other female deities, Xochiquetzal maintains her youthful appearance and is often depicted in opulent attire and gold adornments.

Tlaloc was the father of Tecciztecatl , possibly with Chalchiuhtlicue. Tlaloc had an older sister named Huixtocihuatl. There is a sanctuary found atop Mount Tlaloc, dedicated to the god, Tlaloc; it is thought that the location of this sanctuary in relation to other temples surrounding it may have been a way for the Aztecs to mark the time of year and keep track of important ceremonial dates.

Archaeological, ethnohistoric, and ethnographic data indicate that these phenomena coincide with the sowing of maize in dry lands associated with agricultural sites.

It also features a structure that housed a statue of Tlaloc in addition to idols of many different religious regions, such as the other sacred mountains.

It rises over two diffierent ecological zones: alpine meadows and subalpine forests. The rainy season starts in May and lasts until October.

The highest annual temperature occurs in April, the onset of the rainy season, and the lowest in December—January. Some years ago weather conditions were slightly more severe, but the best time to climb the mountain was practically the same as today: October through December, and February until the beginning of May.

The date of the feast of Huey Tozotli celebrated atop Mount Tlaloc coincided with a period of the highest annual temperature, shortly before dangerous thunderstorms might block access to the summit.

The first detailed account of Mount Tlaloc by Jim Rickards in was followed by visits or descriptions by other scholars. In Wicke and Horcasitas carried out preliminary archaeological investigations at the site; their conclusions were repeated by Parsons in Archaeo-astronomical research began in , some of which remains unpublished.

In excavation was undertaken at the site by Solis and Townsend. Contemporary artist Jesse Hernandez has interpreted Tlaloc in his "Urban Aztec" style at several points throughout his career, including hand-painted upon a 16" Qee in , as a painting titled Rain God in , and as a factory-produced Dunny with Kidrobot in It was a plan developed by Nozama Pharmacy's Reika Mizusawa to use a manufactured chemical pesticide deployed by flying robot drones mixed with rain water to destroy all the Amazons in a genocidal assault, similar to Tlaloc's ability to send down rain.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Redirected from Tlaloc. For the fish genus, see Tlaloc fish. Richard Introduction to Classical Nahuatl revised ed.

Norman: University of Oklahoma Press. To him was attributed the rain; for he made it, he caused it to come down, he scattered the rain like seed, and also the hail.

He caused to sprout, to blossom, to leaf out, to bloom, to ripen, the trees, the plants, our food. Garden History.

Aztecs: Reign of Blood and Splendor.

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